About

Each of us is connected to rivers in our everyday lives. Most of the six million people living in the Potomac River watershed do not realize that their drinking water comes from the Potomac. Since the Clean Water Act passed in 1972, the health of the river has improved. However, it is still in trouble and faces a number of serious threats: urban development, population growth and runoff from farms, pharmaceuticals and chemicals. The film follows the flow of the Potomac water from its origin, into our homes and businesses and back into the river. We become aware of the need to protect this essential resource and of how our wellbeing and that of future generations is intertwined with the health of the Potomac. 
Co Directed, Produced and Written by Peggy Fleming and Sean Furmage. 

austudents
left to right: Jenny Bastien, Mac Mendelovici, Greg Saperstein, Katie Pietrucha, Hannah McCarthy, Peggy Fleming, Sean Furmage, Toby Mues,not in photo Stephanie Vavonese

This film grew out of a partnership between Maryland Public Television and the Center for Environmental Filmmaking (CEF) at American University, which was founded and directed by Chris Palmer.  Each year, students in Sandy Cannon-Brown’s Environmental & Wildlife Production course produce, from concept through editing, films for MPT’s Chesapeake Bay Week.  Sandy, who served as the Executive Producer, continued to work on the film with three students who reworked the student production into a professional documentary.

Peggy Fleming – Co-Director, Producer and Writer
MA program, School of Communication, American
University, Washington, DC. Retired Park Ranger,
Resources Management, Rock Creek Park,  National
Park Service

peggyflemingphotographer.com

Sean Furmage – Co-Director, Producer and Writer
PhD, Cultural Anthropology, 3rd year, American University, Washington, DC

 

Toby Mues – Editor
Undergrad senior, American University, Washington, DC

Post Production provided by Henninger Media Services

Music by Sam Nuttle  and Brandon Jones

Special Thanks to DC Prep Edgewood Middle School and the John Eaton After School Program, “JEAP”